Our Mission

To educate the public about an economics that supports both people and the planet. We believe that a fair and sustainable economy is possible and that citizens working for the common interest can build systems to achieve it. We recognize that the environmental and equity crises we now face have their roots in the current economic system.  

Managing the Commons

At the 35th Annual E. F. Schumacher Lectures, both Bren Smith and Allan Savory advocated for managing the commons, rather than "letting nature just take its own course." They spoke on behalf of climate-change abatement, food security, job creation, and the health of both land and sea.

A 7,000 Acre Classroom

In a little over a year from now, the 25 students taking part in Schumacher College for New Economists will shake out their boots and set foot on Sallie Calhoun’s 7,000 acre Paicines Ranch. Their week at the ranch will include a crash course in impact investing and designing new agricultural models.

The Peace Economy and the Pope

If you asked Judy Wicks what she would say about economics in the wake of International Peace Day, she would tell you, “The foundation for world peace is building an economy where every community is self-reliant in basic needs such as food, water and energy.”

Tax, Gift, Redistribute, or Reform?

"If democracy is someday to regain control of capitalism, it must start by recognizing that the concrete institutions in which democracy and capitalism are embedded need to be re-invented again and again." - Thomas Piketty, Capital in the 21st Century

Announcing - 35th Annual Lectures, Savory & Smith

When, in his 1981 E. F. Schumacher Lecture, Wes Jackson gave a “Call for a Revolution in Agriculture” he was not simply talking about changing tools and techniques, he was talking about a shift in thinking, a shift of culture.

Thwarting Leaky Buckets And Other Local Economy Adventures

In the leaky bucket analogy for local economies, money flows into a region to circulate through local businesses like water into a bucket. Water that leaks out is money that escapes the local economy to pay for imports. The more watertight the bucket, the more wealth retained.

Profiles in Community Economics

This past weekend, in over 150 cities on six continents, people joined their fellow citizens on neighborhood walks to discuss the history of their city, observe its current state of affairs, and imagine its future together. In New York City the Municipal Art Society of New York alone listed over two hundred walks throughout the five boroughs.

Communities Need New Economists of Their Own

The transformation to fair and sustainable regional economies requires place-based, citizen-driven tools. The principles behind these tools are universal, but their effective application will be shaped by the landscape, the people, the history, and the culture of each particular region. 

Economics, What's Esthetics Got to Do With It?

In her 1984 book Cities and the Wealth of Nations, the remarkable Jane Jacobs writes not about economics, but about economic life. She observes economies in motion, not in stasis, and argues that city regions are the heart of that economic life – pulsing, changing, and engaging in "exuberant episodes of import-replacing." 
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