Our Mission

To educate the public about an economics that supports both people and the planet. We believe that a fair and sustainable economy is possible and that citizens working for the common interest can build systems to achieve it. We recognize that the environmental and equity crises we now face have their roots in the current economic system.  

Tax, Gift, Redistribute, or Reform?

"If democracy is someday to regain control of capitalism, it must start by recognizing that the concrete institutions in which democracy and capitalism are embedded need to be re-invented again and again." - Thomas Piketty, Capital in the 21st Century
 

Announcing - 35th Annual Lectures, Savory & Smith

When, in his 1981 E. F. Schumacher Lecture, Wes Jackson gave a “Call for a Revolution in Agriculture” he was not simply talking about changing tools and techniques, he was talking about a shift in thinking, a shift of culture.

Thwarting Leaky Buckets And Other Local Economy Adventures

In the leaky bucket analogy for local economies, money flows into a region to circulate through local businesses like water into a bucket. Water that leaks out is money that escapes the local economy to pay for imports. The more watertight the bucket, the more wealth retained.

Profiles in Community Economics

This past weekend, in over 150 cities on six continents, people joined their fellow citizens on neighborhood walks to discuss the history of their city, observe its current state of affairs, and imagine its future together. In New York City the Municipal Art Society of New York alone listed over two hundred walks throughout the five boroughs.

Communities Need New Economists of Their Own

The transformation to fair and sustainable regional economies requires place-based, citizen-driven tools. The principles behind these tools are universal, but their effective application will be shaped by the landscape, the people, the history, and the culture of each particular region. 

Economics, What's Esthetics Got to Do With It?

In her 1984 book Cities and the Wealth of Nations, the remarkable Jane Jacobs writes not about economics, but about economic life. She observes economies in motion, not in stasis, and argues that city regions are the heart of that economic life – pulsing, changing, and engaging in "exuberant episodes of import-replacing." 
 

Finding Focus Points for Transition

As proponents of a transition to a new economy we have identified the following focus points for our work:

Creative Enterprise in a New Economy: 34th Annual E. F. Schumacher Lectures

Judy Wicks was advised by friends to franchise her popular White Dog Café but she rejected the suggestion. The White Dog was shaped by its Philadelphia neighborhood, by Judy's hosting style and tastes, by the regional farmers who supplied the restaurant, by the staff drawn to work there, and by the culture of its customers. It was a business deeply embedded in place. She could not replicate the White Dog, but she could encourage other entrepreneurs to look to the people, streets, and shops of their own community to shape the business of their passion.

War and Peace, Climate Change & Citizen Responses

The pursuit of a new economics has broad implications.  Our Earth is in crisis; our communities are in crisis. At the heart of these twin issues is an economic system that treats land, air, water, and minerals – our common inheritance – as commodities to be bought and sold on the market. An economic system that distributes the income from that inheritance to a relatively few "owners," whose wealth increases disproportionately as a result, leading to social disruption.

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