mondragon

Lessons from Basque Country

 

In the 1950s Father José María Arizmendiarrieta, the village priest of Mondragón in the Basque region of Spain, inspired the development of a series of cooperatively owned industries to employ youth in his parish.  His vision was that, through ownership by the workers, the wealth created by new industries would be distributed to the workers and to the larger community that nourished and supported them.

 

Community Supported Industry

Identifying a Strategy

 
Building a responsible movement for a new economy will require planning how to create new jobs without increased growth.  One approach is a strategy of import-replacement, with more labor intensive, smaller batch production, transported over shorter distances. The goal would be to create more jobs, but not more "stuff," with a smaller carbon footprint overall.  This may be an ambitious objective, but it is necessary if we are to transition to an economic system that is both equitable and sustainable. 
 
Such a strategy will take a cultural shift as well as an economic one.

The home of the Schumacher Center for a New Economics is the Berkshire region of Massachusetts.  As we are committed to the implementation as well as the development of a new economics the task for us has been how to create a diverse and vital Berkshire economy independent of, and resilient toward, fluctuations in the outside economy.  The process has engaged us with local, regional, and national partner organizations working to identify solutions to similar problems.
 

Mondragon: Reclaiming Regional Production Capacity

Judith Schwartz's article on the Mondragon Cooperatives was posted today at Miller-McCune.

The loss of productive capacity and skills leaves regional economies vulnerable. Mondragon provides an example of how to reverse that trend and create new jobs.

http://www.miller-mccune.com/business_economics/this-import-might-preser...

This Import Might Preserve American Jobs
Might a cooperative model that arose from ashes of a civil war serve the Rust Belt economies of America's Midwest?

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